Witham Hall Barnard Castle


The Town

Barnard Castle has been recognised nationally as one of the 50 most historically and architecturally important towns in Great Britain and listed in The Sunday Times Best Places to Live in Britain. The Grade II listed Witham Hall is an important, central feature of the townscape, located where Horsemarket meets the Market Place.

The Hall

The Witham Testimonial was built by public subscription as a memorial to Henry T.M. Witham of Lartington, a palaeobotanist and philanthropist who had strived to make provision for the medical and educational needs of Barnard Castle before his death in 1844. Hence the building, which opened in 1846, housed the Mechanics’ Institute and a Dispensary for the Relief of the Sick Poor. By 1860, a large music hall had been built to the rear of the Testimonial Building, whilst the premises later incorporated several small cottages in Hall Street. Together these buildings became known as The Witham and have continued to be used by the people of Barnard Castle as a backdrop for celebration, for participation and for people to gain new experiences.

2013 marks the culmination of over 10 years work to raise money and carry out work to restore its historic fabric and make The Witham fit-for-purpose as a fully accessible modern arts venue for the 21st century. The redevelopment project has seen the original Grade II listed Witham buildings restored, and a new link building constructed between the Witham Testimonial and the Event Hall, incorporating a foyer area, café bar and toilets. In addition, Durham County Council has extended and refurbished its Library building to the rear of The Witham buildings, to include new council offices and a customer access point as well as the continued Library service.

Funding of the project principally came from Durham County Council investing over £2 million with match funding of £336,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) and £773,879 from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). The ERDF funding is part of a wider programme which has brought more than £300 million to the North East. The Witham and Library development project was led by Barnard Castle Vision, Durham County Council and The Witham Directors.

Features

Hire Charges: Contact the hall directly Registered Charity Number: 1146726

Contact

Centre Manager – 01833 631107 Email: admin@thewitham.org.uk The Witham, 3 Horsemarket, Barnard Castle DL12 8LY Registered Charity Number: 1146726

Facilities

WCWC

ParkingOn Street Parking
Ramp DownRamp (down)

Ramp UpRamp (up)

Wheelchair Access to SideWheelchair Access to Side (by prior arr.)



Event Information:

  • Fri
    13
    Sep
    2019

    Katie Doherty and the Navigators

    7:30 pmWitham Hall, Horse Market, Barnard Castle DL12 8LYwww.thewitham.org.uk 01833 631107 info@thewitham.org.uk Centre Manager£14.00, £12.00 in advance

    It is said that a change is as good as a rest, and for Katie Doherty it is both a rest, and a change, that provide the backdrop to her latest album 'And Then'  Back in 2007, Doherty became an award-winning songwriter, and released her debut solo album Bridges to much acclaim - including airplay from BBC Radio 2 - leading her to share stages with the likes of Karine Polwart, Kate & Anna McGarrigle, and Ray Davies. Life however - as it has a habit of doing - got in the way, putting the brakes for the moment on a soaring trajectory.

    It was after the success of November Club’s rural touring musical Beyond The End of the Road, for which Katie composed the score, that a spark was ignited and The Navigators emerged. Shona Mooney on fiddle and vocals (The Shee, former BBC Radio Scotlands Young Traditional Musician of the year)and Dave Gray on melodeon and vocals (Världens Band) elevate Katie’s songs, and the trio often sound much bigger than a three.

    It perhaps should not be a huge surprise then that much of Doherty’s new album is rooted in her keen observation of the concept of change. Whether the focus be on the changing seasons, life circumstances, the passage of time, or the shifting of social attitudes and behaviour, on And Then we see Doherty shine a light on how it feels to be part of a world that can be hard

    “Hers is an ascent worth following… and then some.” - Folk Radio

    “And Then is a timely interval, a brief moment if respite, an oasis of tranquility…thankfully there are those in the world who have the foresight to take stock and recognise whats important” FATEA Magazine

    “Real life has rarely sounded as good.” - NARK Magazine

    “This is lovely!” - Mark Radcliffe

    “And Then is poetic, original and brings a traditional folk style into the 21st Century” - Maverick Magazine

    “And Then, well, play it again. It’s an album of great musicianship to bring you joy and was well worth waiting for” - ArtsDesk.com"