Witham Hall Barnard Castle


The Town

Barnard Castle has been recognised nationally as one of the 50 most historically and architecturally important towns in Great Britain and listed in The Sunday Times Best Places to Live in Britain. The Grade II listed Witham Hall is an important, central feature of the townscape, located where Horsemarket meets the Market Place.

The Hall

The Witham Testimonial was built by public subscription as a memorial to Henry T.M. Witham of Lartington, a palaeobotanist and philanthropist who had strived to make provision for the medical and educational needs of Barnard Castle before his death in 1844. Hence the building, which opened in 1846, housed the Mechanics’ Institute and a Dispensary for the Relief of the Sick Poor. By 1860, a large music hall had been built to the rear of the Testimonial Building, whilst the premises later incorporated several small cottages in Hall Street. Together these buildings became known as The Witham and have continued to be used by the people of Barnard Castle as a backdrop for celebration, for participation and for people to gain new experiences.

2013 marks the culmination of over 10 years work to raise money and carry out work to restore its historic fabric and make The Witham fit-for-purpose as a fully accessible modern arts venue for the 21st century. The redevelopment project has seen the original Grade II listed Witham buildings restored, and a new link building constructed between the Witham Testimonial and the Event Hall, incorporating a foyer area, café bar and toilets. In addition, Durham County Council has extended and refurbished its Library building to the rear of The Witham buildings, to include new council offices and a customer access point as well as the continued Library service.

Funding of the project principally came from Durham County Council investing over £2 million with match funding of £336,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) and £773,879 from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). The ERDF funding is part of a wider programme which has brought more than £300 million to the North East. The Witham and Library development project was led by Barnard Castle Vision, Durham County Council and The Witham Directors.

Features

Hire Charges: Contact the hall directly Registered Charity Number: 1146726

Contact

Centre Manager – 01833 631107 Email: admin@thewitham.org.uk The Witham, 3 Horsemarket, Barnard Castle DL12 8LY Registered Charity Number: 1146726

Facilities

WCWC

ParkingOn Street Parking
Ramp DownRamp (down)

Ramp UpRamp (up)

Wheelchair Access to SideWheelchair Access to Side (by prior arr.)



Event Information:

  • Sat
    25
    Apr
    2020

    Arcade : feat. Heidi Talbot and Adam Holmes

    8:00 pmWitham Hall, Horse Market, Barnard Castle DL12 8LYwww.thewitham.org.uk 01833 631107 info@thewitham.org.uk Centre Manager£17.00, in advance £15.00

    For the first time Ireland’s Heidi Talbot and Scotland’s Adam Holmes are joining forces to tour, write and record an album of original material together. Between them they have been nominated for multiple BBC Folk Awards, SAY awards, Irish music awards and played for First Ministers and US Presidents.

    This new collaboration will see the pair work under the name “Arcade”, with plans to record and release a new album of songs in 2019 produced by Louis Abbott (Admiral Fallow).

    Heidi Talbot was born in Ireland, became a folk star in the USA as a member of the Irish American band Cherish the Ladies, and now lives in Edinburgh. With a background like that, it’s hardly surprising she should develop a style that switches easily between Celtic and Americana, but subtlety is Talbot’s magic ingredient. From her gossamer voice to the delicate re-working of traditional and contemporary material that has earned her rave reviews for her records and live performances.

    The girl from Co. Kildare, who spent several years in New York, slips effortlessly between musical worlds but retains a personal modesty rooted in traditional folk.

    “A voice that’s both awestruck and tender” The New York Times

    Edinburgh based singer song writer Adam Holmes with his band The Embers combine the rhythm and blues, country and folk music textures of classic artists such as The Band, Neil Young and Ryan Adams and The Cardinals.

    Adam’s musical education began in the infamous folk clubs of Edinburgh taken along by his mother, a huge fan of UK folk music. He witnessed the legendary live sessions that took place. His father’s influence was equally strong, a love of classic American singer songwriters (notably Neil Young and Townes Van Zandt) which he passed onto to his son, now evident in the transatlantic quality to Adam’s music.